Irina Zatulovskaya

Irina Zatulovskaya. Back Home. 2017. Embroidery, Venetian silk, wool, cloth, gold. 36 × 223 mm. Courtesy of the artist

Irina Zatulovskaya. Back Home. 2017. Embroidery, Venetian silk, wool, cloth, gold. 36 × 223 mm. Courtesy of the artist


Irina Zatulovskaya. A Self-portrait on a Frying Pan. 2017. Embroidery, Venetian silk, wool, cloth, gold. Courtesy of the artist

Irina Zatulovskaya. A Self-portrait on a Frying Pan. 2017. Embroidery, Venetian silk, wool, cloth, gold. Courtesy of the artist


Irina Zatulovskaya. The Binding of Isaac. 2017. Embroidery, Venetian silk, wool, cloth, gold. Courtesy of the artist

Irina Zatulovskaya. The Binding of Isaac. 2017. Embroidery, Venetian silk, wool, cloth, gold. Courtesy of the artist


Irina Zatulovskaya. The Expulsion from the Garden of Eden. 2017. Embroidery, Venetian silk, wool, cloth, gold. Courtesy of the artist

Irina Zatulovskaya. The Expulsion from the Garden of Eden. 2017. Embroidery, Venetian silk, wool, cloth, gold. Courtesy of the artist


Irina Zatulovskaya. The Crucifixtion. 2017. Embroidery, Venetian silk, wool, cloth, gold. Courtesy of the artist

Irina Zatulovskaya. The Crucifixtion. 2017. Embroidery, Venetian silk, wool, cloth, gold. Courtesy of the artist


Back Home

Embroidery, Venetian silk, wool, cloth, gold, Venetian brocade, Venetian velvet
2017 

A series of works furnished on a horizontal canvas of Venetian textile, brings together several themes: the Old Testament (Expulsion from the Garden of Eden, Binding of Isaac), the Gospel (Crucifixion), and the contemporary (Self-portrait, Little Black Dress). Together they form a generalized narrative of repentance, returning home and returning to oneself.

Her relationship with the media defines Zatulovskaya as an artist. Irina rarely paints on canvas, her signature technique is painting on wood or metal. She finds materials for her works mainly in the old abandoned countryside houses or at the dumps, where they have long lost their original cleanness and functionality. A few touches of two or three colors give birth to an image – it is a result of combination of the artist's ascetic gesture and the traces left on the surface by nature, people, and time. This artistic gesture can be also seen as a metaphor of resurrection and salvation.

Irina Zatulovskaya considers herself one of the followers of the Russian avant-garde artist Mikhail Matyushin, and calls her work "expanded realism". Matyushin sought to create the new image of nature on the picture plane by teaching the eye to perceive every visible detail as part of the great whole. The result of Matyushin's "expanded vision" is seeing the synthetic image of the world and its fourth dimension.


Irina Zatulovskaya (b. 1954, Moscow, Russia) – artist. Her works are in collections of the largest Russian museums, as well as of the Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art (Helsinki, Finland), the Museum of Warsaw (Poland), Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art of Trento and Rovereto (Italy).