Masaki Fujihata

Private room / TV. 2009–2010. Media installation. Dimensions variable. Supported by Tokyo Gallery + BTAP. Courtesy of the artist

Private room / TV. 2009–2010. Media installation. Dimensions variable. Supported by Tokyo Gallery + BTAP. Courtesy of the artist


Private room / TV. 2009–2010. Media installation. Dimensions variable. Supported by Tokyo Gallery + BTAP. Courtesy of the artist

Private room / TV. 2009–2010. Media installation. Dimensions variable. Supported by Tokyo Gallery + BTAP. Courtesy of the artist


Private room

Media installation
2009–2010

In this work Fujihata recalls the golden age of television, when it had set up an invisible network of viewers. This medium introduced the ability to share an experience with friends or relatives, classmates who are supposedly watching from some other place, or even unknown people yet further away, while sitting in a well-lit room at home. Today the viewers can again feel the community of a global home – the world of virtual networks. However this space turns out to be fragmented, split into icons, and its elements form a kind of a global database.

Today panorama in its classical form gets fragmented, and the viewer is immersed into a multilayered world of images. The archive of memory forms a panorama of our sensations and tactile perceptions. Our journeys and memories of them are linked in a single network that permeates contemporary global home and connects us with the world.


Masaki Fujihata (b. 1956, Tokyo, Japan) is a media artist. He was one of the first artists to use stereolithography; he also created the world's smallest sculptures by using the manufacturing techniques for integrated circuits. However, he is most recognized for his interactive network installations examining the possibilities for communication within virtual spaces. He has exhibited at the Ars Electronica (Linz), CyberForum (Lisbon), and his work is part of the permanent collection of the ZKM (Karlsruhe).